Ocala Violent Crimes Attorney

A violent crime in the state of Florida is defined as an intentional, aggressive action against a person or property that threatens, inflicts, or attempts to inflict physical harm. In the state of Florida, a violent crime can be prosecuted as a felony. If convicted the offender may face years in a state prison and could also face losing rights and possession of a permanent criminal record. The definition of a violent crime is broad, examples of violent activity that are considered violent crimes include:

Homicide – The Unlawful killing of a human being by act, by procurement, or by culpable negligence.

Robbery – The use of force, violence or assault, or invoking fear of such to an individual in order to take money or other property from the owner.

Assault – The unlawful intentional threat of inflicting violence n another with the apparent ability to do so.

Battery – The intentional and actual touching or striking of another against their will or the intentional causing of bodily harm

Kidnapping – The Abducting, imprisoning, or confining of another against his or her will without legal authority.

Child Abuse – Any action or failure as a guardian that result in the injury or trauma of a child.

Conspiracy to Commit Violent Crime – The planning of a violent crime regardless if the act ever occurred.

The penalties for a violent crime will vary from crime to crime, although first-degree murder is the only conviction that is eligible for the death penalty.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT VIOLENT CRIMES

What are the possible ways my case may be resolved?

What are the possible ways my case may be resolved?

Typically, criminal cases are resolved in one of the following ways; The State Drops the Charges Being proactive and hiring an experienced defense attorney quickly may led to the State dropping your case.  For example, the fact that the police make an arrest does not...

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What are the possible ways my case may be resolved?

What happens if the police didn’t read me my rights?

On television you typically hear the police advise a person being arrested of their rights (known as Miranda rights) as they are being handcuffed. This is not how it happens in real life. In fact, the police are not required to advise an arrested person of these...

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What are the possible ways my case may be resolved?

When are the police allowed to search me?

Typically, the police can only search you or your property if you give consent, there is a search warrant or the search is incident to a lawful arrest. Please note that there are other limited circumstances in which a search may be lawful and that it is important to...

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What are the possible ways my case may be resolved?

What is an arraignment?

An arraignment is the procedure where the state attorney announces the formal charges in your case and you enter a plea of guilty or not guilty. At a misdemeanor arraignment, the State may offer you a plea deal and the court will allow you to enter a plea of guilty or...

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What are the possible ways my case may be resolved?

What is the difference between a felony and misdemeanor?

In Florida, crimes are ranked in terms of severity and the maximum penalties that may be imposed if an accused is convicted of that particular crime. Misdemeanors are less serious charges and are handled in county court. They are generally punishable by up to one(1)...

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352-629-7222

Proctor Legal, Inc.
522 SW 1st Avenue
Ocala, FL 34471

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