Ocala Violation of Probation Attorney

In Ocala, most criminal prosecutions result in the accused being placed on probation. Probation requires compliance with standard as well as special conditions that are ordered by the court. Standard conditions of probation usually include maintaining steady employment, reporting monthly to the probation office, and the payment of fines and court costs. Special conditions of probation may include but are not limited to the completion of classes, drug /alcohol screens, and the payment of restitution. Failure to comply with conditions of probation result in a violation of probation. 

If you have violated your probation in Ocala or a surrounding area, the consequences can be quite severe. Some commonly imposed sanctions on a violation for probation include but are not limited to revocation of supervision, new criminal charges being brought against you and even jail or prison sentences. Because there is a “zero tolerance” policy on probation violations you should immediately contact an experienced Ocala criminal defense attorney.  If there is a violation, the probation officer will submit an affidavit of violation of probation and send it to the judge who originally imposed the sentence. The Judge will than issue an arrest warrant and will most likely require a “no bond” status and a person accused of violating probation must remain in custody until the case is resolved.

An experienced defense attorney can explore any defenses that may exist on a violation of probation case, help prepare any mitigation for the court and expedite the handling of these matters. Carrie Proctor, an experienced Ocala defense attorney has a proven track record of aggressively defending her client’s accused of violating probation. 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT PROBATION

What is probation? What do I have to do on probation?

What is probation? What do I have to do on probation?

A: Probation is a period of time that’s ordered by the court when imposing sentence. Probation could either be supervised probation or administrative probation. Depending upon the nature of the charge and the sentencing court, you may have specific conditions that will have to be met during your period of probation or supervision.

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What is probation? What do I have to do on probation?

What happens if I violate my probation?

A: If you violate your probation, the judge that placed you on that probation will then issue a warrant for your arrest. Depending upon the basis for the violation of probation, you may or may not be entitled to have a bond when you’re picked up on that warrant. It’s important to speak with an attorney, prior to the warrant being issued, in order to be adequately prepared at that violation of probation hearing. Typically, if you do not have a private attorney, it takes between two and three weeks before you’ll actually have a court date with your original sentencing judge.

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What is probation? What do I have to do on probation?

How long will I be on probation?

A: The typical term of probation on a misdemeanor is one year. On felony cases, it can vary. The typical felony probationary term is between one year and three years. A lot of it depends upon the sentencing judge, and who the prosecutor is.

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What is probation? What do I have to do on probation?

Can I terminate probation early?

A: Unless the judge that imposed sentence specifically stated that you could, that you can’t terminate probation early, you always have the opportunity to file a motion for early termination of probation. Typically, a judge will not entertain that motion unless you’ve completed at least half of your probationary period, and have completed all the specific terms and conditions of that probation.

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Contact Us

 

352-629-7222

Proctor Legal, Inc.
522 SW 1st Avenue
Ocala, FL 34471

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